Why we must support black carers

THROUGHOUT THE UK there are a lot of people who care, unpaid, for a family member or friend who due to illness, disability, a mental health problem or an addiction cannot cope without their support, and provide assistance to them in diverse ways.

Conventional wisdom suggests that most ethnic minority people will care for their loved ones, children and relatives. The reality however is that this unpaid duty can leave carers physically, mentally and emotionally drained to the extent that, the longer they carry out this role without support, the more likely they are in danger of their becoming unwell themselves and isolated.

Talking about sexual issues and dementia

Julia Medew

Photo: Wayne Taylor

As dementia slowly took over Anne Fairhall’s husband’s brain during his 50s and 60s, his personality changed in many unexpected ways.

The normally diplomatic academic and senior executive started losing his temper while driving his car and, on a few occasions, lashed out at Anne in public for no good reason.

Carers of people with a mental illness feel the stigma too, says Cambridge expert

The carers of those with mental ill health often feel that stigma – real or imagined.

David Jordan

By CambridgeNews  |  Posted: April 08, 2015

Unfortunately, despite the promise of a substantial increase in the funding for mental health over the next five years, the funding of mental health services in Cambridgeshire has been one of the lowest in the country for decades.

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