Older women become primary carers during partner's final days, research shows

The role of the family is crucial

New research shows that older women are often the primary carers for their partner when they reach the end of their life.

More than 60% of informal care is provided by a spouse or partner – mainly women between the age of 35 and 64.

Carers urged to claim credit to boost state pension

A carer could receive more than £200 extra

Thousands of people with caring responsibilities are missing out on credits they are eligible for which could boost their pension by hundreds of pounds a year.

Currently, only an estimated one in 20 (5%) of those eligible have signed up to receive these additional contributions which will fill gaps in their National Insurance records, the Government said.

Carers should receive what they’re entitled to

Baroness Altmann

ACROSS Britain, 6.5million people are supporting a loved one who is elderly, disabled or seriously ill.

This is the country’s wonderful army of carers.

Unpaid and often unrecognised, they play a vital role – not just to the relatives, partners, parents, children, friends or neighbours for whom they care – but for our society.

It is no secret that we are living longer.

People are now surviving for years with illnesses and disabilities which, just a generation or two ago, would have meant an earlier death.

People with such conditions can live life to the full.

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