Monthly Archives: August 2012

One in five patients ‘harmed’ in some hospitals

One in five patients in some NHS hospitals suffer harm due to avoidable accidents, complications and mistakes, it has emerged.

The data has been assembled via a monthly series of snapshots, gathered by frontline clinical staff since April

By , Medical Editor

6:00AM BST 31 Aug 2012

Official NHS data has shown that more than 20 per cent of patients in some organisations suffer from problems such as bed sores or suffer accidents such as falls while on wards.

Nationally just under one in ten, or around 41,000 people, were harmed, but this masks wide variation in individual hospitals, it was found.

The Department of Health has set a target to deliver “harm-free care” to 95 per cent of patients “by 2012”.

Officials admitted around 200,000 patients suffer common avoidable problems over the course of a year.

The NHS Safety Thermometer, launched in April, gathers data from all NHS hospitals covering patient problems such as bed sores and patient falls that can be avoided with good care.

Carers urged to look for support

Carers need a break as well otherwise they end up making themselves ill and becoming the one who needs caring for

By Ian Dipple 31/08 Updated: 31/08 09:45

 Mayor Alan Mason with Peter Nash, of Age UK, cafe manager Pebbles Crompton, Helen Simmons, of Crossroads Care and Rosie Powell from Carers Careline. Photo by Marcus Mingins 3212005MMR

THE MAYOR of Redditch has urged the borough’s carers to seek help.

Coun Alan Mason said it was important people looking after loved ones were not too proud to look for and accept the wealth of support on offer, especially so-called ‘hidden carers’ who consider themselves to only be doing their duty.

Mr Mason looks after his wife Nina, who has difficulty walking, but he admitted until recently he was one of those who had never considered himself to be a carer.

Doubts raised over safety of ‘doctor by broadband’

Patients could be put at risk by using internet-based equipment to manage their conditions from home, the lead investigator of a nationwide trial into the technology has warned.
Ministers are keen to push ‘telehealth’ – where people with chronic conditions help manage their own conditions from home – but there are questions over safety.
Ministers are keen to push ‘telehealth’ – where people with chronic conditions help manage their own conditions from home – but there are questions over safety.
Stephen Adams

By Stephen Adams, Medical Correspondent

3:01PM BST 30 Aug 2012

Ministers are keen to push the benefits of telehealth, in which people with long term conditions like diabetes and heart disease submit readings to doctors and nurses online.

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